GIRL, QUIT ALL THIS HOMESTUCKING AROUND.
Witch Class Hood Tutorial for Dummies

No math equations or mysterious voodoo required!

Tutorials referenced:  Seer Hood

What you will need:

  • 3 yds fabric and matching thread (stiffer fabric is recommended, but if not using stiff fabric, also get 1 yd of fleece for stability, as mentioned in the linked tutorial)
  • Two big buttons (if hood is for Jade or a troll)
  • optional:  polyfill stuffing

Now let’s get started!

You will need to cut out three basic shapes:

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Cut two of each.  Some helpful guidelines:

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Step for buttonholes only:  In pieces 1 and 2, you will cut a hole big enough to accommodate your ears/horns as well as a straight line from the center of your holes to the front edge.  Make sure your hole is far enough away from the front edge for a thick enough flap, and far enough away from the top edge that it will fit over your ears/horns without any trouble.  It helps to measure where the ears/horns sit on your head and figure it into the pattern (for instance, if your ears are 4 inches apart, put the hole’s edge 2 inches + seam allowance away from the top edge).  If you are in a position where you can’t measure your ears/horns accurately, just make the holes really big.  Make sure that the hole cuts for both pieces match—this is very important!

Take piece 3 and sew here:

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Take piece 1 and sew here:

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Take piece 2 and sew here:

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Great job, buddy.  Next, you’re going to take piece 3, open it up with the seam on the outside, and pin one side of it to the matching side of piece 2, which should also have the seam on the outside.  In other words, just make sure the right sides are together.

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Shown is the right side pinned.  Sew both top and bottom sides; you should be able to do it in one seam if you turn the fabric at the point.  The new top seam should meet (or come close to meeting) the top seam you put in piece 2 earlier.  Don’t sweat it if it doesn’t; it’s a simple fix.  Once that’s done, pin and sew the other side.

BEFORE YOU TURN INSIDE OUT, trim any excess fabric from the tips.  Get as close as you can to the seam without actually cutting the seam.  If you skip this step,  you are only making your life miserable when you try to turn the hood inside out.

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Okay, NOW you can turn the hood inside out.  Congratulations, the hood now has two tails.  If there is a hole near where all the seams meet, take your favorite invisible hand-stitch (I recommend the slip stitch) and sew the hole closed.

This next step is optional, but if you’d like to have the ends of your hood look a little less limp, grab some of this stuff:

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…or anything that you could use to stuff a plush toy.  Carefully take a little at a time and stuff it into each tail until it is puffy enough for you.  You will probably need to use a stick or something to get it to reach all the way to the end.

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I stuffed about 12 inches of the end and decided that was enough.

For no buttonholes:  Take pieces 1 and the now combined 2 and 3, match the front edges and pin with the right sides together.  Sew, then turn piece 1 so it’s inside piece 2/3.  Congratulations, the top part of your hood is done!

For buttonholes:  Essentially you’ll be doing the same thing as if you didn’t have buttonholes.  There’s just a different ending shape you’re aiming for.  So how do we get that shape, hmmm?

First, you’re going to cut four rectangles, about an inch and a half long and as wide as the line from your ear/horn hole to the front edge.  Sew one to each of the inside flaps, or the flaps nearest the seam line, right sides together.  Do this for both pieces 1 and 2/3.

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Now it’s time to sew the front.  Put piece 1 on top of piece 2/3, right sides together.  Match up all the edges and new flaps, pin, and sew carefully.  You may want to make the outside flaps, the ones which will ultimately have the buttonhole, with a more rounded seam.  CLIP YOUR CURVES before you turn it inside out, or else the fabric will be ridiculously lumpy.

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Turn it inside out and see how it looks.  Make sure to push out the flaps.  If any of the seams didn’t catch, just turn it out again and re-sew.  If the area around the hole looks lumpy, turn it out and clip some more curves.

Now grab your buttons, mark on the outside flaps how big it is, and make a buttonhole for it.

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Cut your new buttonhole in the middle.  On the inside flaps, sew your buttons.  Now it’s time to see if your hard work paid off.

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Can the buttonflaps open and close without any major problems?  Hell yeah they can!  (or should)

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Can they accommodate the size and placement of your ears/horns?  Yes?  Then my friend, you have just finished the top part of your awesome Witch hood.  Congratulations!

So what about the bottom part?

I’m honestly not going to tell you anything that’s different than what’s outlined in the Seer hood tutorial, so look at that tutorial, starting with step 8, except make the shape less round and more diamond-like and not as long.  Voila.

Didn’t understand something?  Still have questions?  My ask box is open!

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    This was so helpful! Thank you! ^w^